Environment California Latest Blog Posts

Halloween is the annual time to celebrate all the creepy things that go bump in the night, but what's really fightening are the many very real threats to our waterways and drinking water. Nothing is more important to life than clean water, yet few things are taken more for granted. We turn on our taps or swim in a local lake without fear because we believe the systems are working to keep our water clean. The fact is, those systems don’t always work, and in many cases, are failing to keep water safe. 

On November 30th, leaders from around the world will sit down and make an international agreement on how each country will work together to cut global warming pollution.

As a part of our solar photo contest, Environment America members sent us pictures and stories to say why they love the sun. The entries we received inspired us. In fact, we got so many great stories and photos that, along with our guest judges, we need your help to choose a winner. Vote today. 

as a part of our solar photo contest.

Last year at this time, the toxic algae bloom in Lake Erie caused nearly half a million people in and around Toledo, Ohio, to be without safe drinking water. Clean water from our taps is something that many of us take for granted, but if we don’t protect our water sources — like the residents of Toledo discovered — we won’t be able to take it for granted anymore.

It’s easy to get overwhelmed when you’re considering solar panels. Many folks confess they aren’t sure where to start. The first question to answer is whether you’re a good candidate. So here's a flow chart to help you. Check it out.

Americans care about clean water for a whole host of reasons – fishing and swimming, protecting wildlife, and safe drinking water. But as I was reminded last week by Jenn Vervier at New Belgium Brewing, clean water is also vital for excellent beer.  Understanding that great beer takes great water, many of America’s breweries have come out in support of the proposed clean water rule. Noticeably absent from the list of the rule’s supporters, however, is America’s biggest brewery: Anheuser-Busch. 

We live in Torrance, California, a mile from the Pacific, and this was ash resulting from a large explosion and fire that occurred at the Exxon Mobil refinery just 3.5 miles away.

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Dan Jacobson
Senior Advisor

From groundbreaking commitments to solving global warming to passing a first-in-the-nation ban on single-use plastic bags, it’s clear that 2014 was a great year for protecting our environment. Thanks to the leadership of environmental champions and the activism of millions of Californians, our air is cleaner, our water is safer, and more of our power than ever before comes from solar and other renewable sources. As we celebrate our victories, let’s resolve to continue moving environmental progress forward in 2015 and defend the gains we’ve made. Here are the top 10 environmental victories for 2014 and 10 challenges for the New Year.

 | by
Dan Jacobson
Senior Advisor

36 years ago the Love Canal disaster changed national environmental policy forever

 | by
Dan Jacobson
Senior Advisor

The California environmental movement today declared its unanimity in calling on Gov. Jerry Brown to halt fracking in the state. Environmental leaders sent a letter signed by more than 70 environmental and health organizations to the governor urging him to be a true climate leader and place a moratorium on dangerous and extreme oil extraction processes. The letter’s signatories include national organizations such as the Natural Resources Defense Council, the Sierra Club, Center on Race, Poverty & the Environment and 350.org, as well as statewide groups including the California Nurses Association and Californians Against Fracking, a coalition of about 200 organizations.