Update: Bill to slash solar red tape clears California Assembly committee

Today, a key committee in the California Assembly passed Senate Bill 379, which requires cities to adopt automated solar permitting. 

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Johanna Neumann
Senior Director, Campaign for 100% Renewable Energy

Author: Johanna Neumann

Senior Director, Campaign for 100% Renewable Energy

(413) 256-6434

On staff: 2001-2003; 2005-present
B.S., Tufts University

Johanna directs strategy and staff for Environment America's energy campaigns at the local, state and national level. In her prior positions, she led the campaign to ban smoking in all Maryland workplaces, helped stop the construction of a new nuclear reactor on the shores of the Chesapeake Bay and helped build the support necessary to pass the EmPOWER Maryland Act, which set a goal of reducing the state’s per capita electricity use by 15 percent. She also currently serves on the board of Community Action Works. Johanna lives in Amherst, Massachusetts, with her family, where she enjoys growing dahlias, biking and the occasional game of goaltimate.

Obtaining a permit to install solar can take days, weeks, or even months in some parts of the country, and can be a complex and costly process. New legislation sponsored by California State Senator Scott Weiner, which just passed a key committee in the State Assembly, aims to fix that by requiring cities to adopt automated solar permitting.

Currently, 16 jurisdictions use the Department of Energy and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory’s Solar Automated Permit Processing (SolarAPP+) platform, which provides cities and counties with free automated plan review, permit approval and tracking for solar projects. 

Automated permitting for solar and other clean energy technologies promises to help more Americans power their homes with clean renewable energy.

Johanna Neumann
Senior Director, Campaign for 100% Renewable Energy

Author: Johanna Neumann

Senior Director, Campaign for 100% Renewable Energy

(413) 256-6434

On staff: 2001-2003; 2005-present
B.S., Tufts University

Johanna directs strategy and staff for Environment America's energy campaigns at the local, state and national level. In her prior positions, she led the campaign to ban smoking in all Maryland workplaces, helped stop the construction of a new nuclear reactor on the shores of the Chesapeake Bay and helped build the support necessary to pass the EmPOWER Maryland Act, which set a goal of reducing the state’s per capita electricity use by 15 percent. She also currently serves on the board of Community Action Works. Johanna lives in Amherst, Massachusetts, with her family, where she enjoys growing dahlias, biking and the occasional game of goaltimate.